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GUM Gallery

The GUM galleries is a huge shopping center, one of the largest in Europe, its main facade faces the Red Square.

The first stores date from the time of Iván El Terrible, divided according to the type of merchandise to be sold: ribbons, soaps, cosmetics, powders, etc., caps (one for men and one for women), footwear, etc. That chaotic and motley market that stretched from Trapería Street (Vetoshny proezd) to Lubianka Street had existed in Red Square until the early 19th century.

That market has been occupied, during later years, with many other shops, but not only stores but also has been a commercial area, for a time it was also a building where government offices were located, when entering the Communism in Russia department stores such as they were an emblem of capitalism and as such could not exist, so they were closed and reopened as administration offices of the central government.

Subsequently, and after the exit of communism in 1991, the stores of the GUM, emblem of capitalism and commerce in Russia were privatized and bought by a businessman based in St. Petersburg, owner of “Bosco”, this textile businessman bought 50.25% of the surface, today it owns 80% of this same surface. He is one of the wealthiest entrepreneurs in Russia. Creator of the equipment of the Olympic team.
The gallery opened in April 2019, simultaneously with the large-scale festival of contemporary art GUM-Red-Line. For two months, Muscovites and guests of the capital had the opportunity to get an idea of ​​contemporary Russian art in the example of the work of the most famous and relevant artists. The festival was widely covered in Russian and foreign media.

The GUM-Red-Line gallery space occupies 280 square meters in front of the building overlooking the Red Square.

In addition to the brilliant architecture of Alexander Pomerantsev, these rooms also have an important historical past: it was here in 1893 that the gallery of Heinrich Afanasevich Brokar, the famous perfumer and collector of Moscow, was opened. Brokar’s exhibitions were held for almost ten years and turned GUM, then the Top Commercial Rows, of a prestigious shopping center into one of the most popular places for Muscovites. The concerts and artistic evenings, which completed the new image of the commercial house, contributed greatly to this.

Contemporary art found its application in the Soviet GUM: in the early 1920s, Vladimir Mayakovsky and Alexander Rodchenko advertised the store.

Maintaining the traditions of the past, GUM-Red-Line Gallery hopes to become the starting point for the formation of a new cultural space where GUM visitors can familiarize themselves with contemporary art.

From the first days of his work, GUM-Red-Line Gallery has become a public platform, allowing artists to meet with their audience and thus bring the viewer and contemporary art closer together.
In addition to the brilliant architecture of Alexander Pomerantsev, these rooms also have an important historical past: it was here in 1893 that the gallery of Heinrich Afanasevich Brokar, the famous perfumer and collector of Moscow, was opened. Brokar’s exhibitions were held for almost ten years and turned GUM, then the Top Commercial Rows, of a prestigious shopping center into one of the most popular places for Muscovites. The concerts and artistic evenings, which completed the new image of the commercial house, contributed greatly to this.

The gallery hosts a variety of cultural events:

  • open discussions
  • Press conferences
  • presentations of new projects
  • performances
  • master classes
  • and other events
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